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Want to be a Property Management Hero?

Posted by [email protected] on Mar. 11, 2020  /  On The Job, Management/Leadership  /   0

Let’s switch gears for a moment…have you ever seen a movie made BEFORE 1970? They usually contain a lot of differences in culture, tobacco and gender references, etc. Did you notice something else?

CREDITS.

Yes, that’s right. The opening credits delineate not only who was in the film, but also worked on it. Those writers, camera grips, makeup artists, and designers make that epic story come to life. Before a familiar face or enticing voice grabs your attention and steals the show, the little-known Cinematographer named Ernest Keller is given a big screen thank you for his work. 

Fast forward to the most recent movie that you saw in the movie theatre…did you see any names other than the production company? Probably not. Additionally, did you stay to watch those miniscule lines of Calibri text scroll until the lights came up and the movie ACTUALLY ended? Again, probably not.

Joseph R. Rinkins might have gotten paid but the recognition left something to be desired.

Tying this back to our field of property management; how many people contribute to your daily activities?  If you had credits at the beginning of each day scrolling while you were brushing your teeth in the mirror, who would be featured and why?

“Giving credit where credit is due” is an age-old saying but it is so important in building and maintaining your professional relationships. Saying thank you to your engineer for his brilliant cost-saving initiative is obvious but what if you were to take that sentiment a step further and site him as the person behind the idea? By doing this, the idea is still beneficial, your engineer is empowered to contribute more frequently, and you just earned some respect from a person you work closely with every day. This sounds like a win-win to me.

Shout out your underappreciated colleague at the office. Your admin can compose a stellar newsletter to the tenants via email on a quarterly basis.  After you review and approve, consider letting her send it from her email address or better yet, let her name be added as a contributor. Small gestures of recognition signifying, “I see you. Thank you for doing this.”

A team member has compiled comprehensive information that you are responsible for presenting to the executive team. They may not be invited to the meeting, but they are in the room via that PowerPoint loading on the screen behind you. If someone took on more responsibility but didn’t get acknowledged, make time to acknowledge them. Truthfully, we all want to be the knight in shining armor, riding on the white horse, proclaiming “Look! I can fix this! I did this.” We want to be heroes…and we can be. It will take 30 seconds to throw some credit in the direction of the involved team member. You may also get some credit yourself for being truthful and a great leader.

Remember: upfront credit will always be appreciated and observed. Public acknowledgement means a lot to those who receive it, and it’s often those who work the hardest who get overlooked. We’ve definitely all been there. Now… be the HERO.

 

Author Bio: Leslie M. Sinclair is an Assistant Property Manager for Gemini Rosemont Commercial Real Estate and a Houston native.  She has an amazing son named Ignatius James and is honored to follow in familiar footsteps as an IREM member and Future Leaders program participant.

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